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This page aggregates blog entries by people who are writing about TeX and related topics.

DANTE Frühjahrstagung 2021

Posted on March 7, 2021 by TeXblog Feed

Im vergangenen Jahr sind leider beide DANTE-Tagungen wegen der Pandemie ausgefallen. Dieses Jahr wird die Frühjahrstagung stattfinden, jedoch wegen der Kontaktbeschränkungen komplett online. Anmelden kann man sich online auf www.dante.de/veranstaltungen/dante2021/anmeldung/ und das ist kurz und einfach und kostet nix. Mitglieder … Continue reading →

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TUG election deadline of March 1

Posted on February 24, 2021 by TeX Users Group Feed

Nominations for the TeX Users Group election for this year are due March 1 (7am PST; no extensions or exceptions). The positions of TUG president and of several directors are up for election. A nomination form and full details are available.

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Nützliche Kommandozeilen-Einzeiler für LaTeX

Posted on February 24, 2021 by Uwe Ziegenhagen Feed

Unter https://gist.github.com/iwishiwasaneagle/2f91f63f3cb0107b94b501aa284a18ca gibt es eine Sammlung an nützlichen Einzeilern für die Arbeit mit LaTeX. UweUwe Ziegenhagen likes LaTeX and Python, sometimes even combined. Do you like my content and would like to thank me for it? Consider making a small donation to my local fablab, the Dingfabrik Köln. Details on how to donate can be […]

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The most important tip for confident LaTeX newbies: Don’t reinvent the wheel! (and try a Minimal Working Example instead)

Posted on February 21, 2021 by LaTeX Ninja'ing and the Digital Humanities Feed

Today I wanted to address a common issue I see in troubleshooting LaTeX errors, on StackOverflow and in personal questions. It usually stems from newbies who aren’t yet aware of all the functionality provided by standard packages and thus, try to reinvent the wheel when something doesn’t work the way they expect. Why reinventing the wheel is a problem In my experience, even from me helping people with packages that I’m not all that familiar with myself, it’s always best not to reinvent the wheel (even if you succeed, the result is likely sub-par unless you’re actually really good at what you’re doing). Ask yourself if the functionality you want is something that’s likely to be a common problem. Then maybe somebody has already solved it in a comprehensive way! That’s what packages are for and that’s why they’re (hopefully) maintained by people who have given the problem at hand a good bit of thought. It is very likely thatread more The most important tip for confident LaTeX newbies: Don’t reinvent the wheel! (and try a Minimal Working Example instead)

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Using keyboard macros to emulate query replace

Posted on February 20, 2021 by Content AND Presentation Feed

A few days ago, however, I needed to do something I consider really blogworthy, even though the tip I’m going to share today is (surprise, surprise!) very Emacs-centric. I was editing a paper which used italics (with the \emph LaTeX macro) really a lot (more than 100 times). Very many (but not all) of its occurrences were to be changed to quotes, so that e.g. \emph{petrichor} should be changed to ,,petrichor’’ etc.

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Long-Term Twitter Strategizing: The Ninja’s “How to better promote your content on Twitter” Guide. Part 4

Posted on February 14, 2021 by LaTeX Ninja'ing and the Digital Humanities Feed

Twitter is an important professional networking platform for the Digital Humanities. But it’s not exactly self-evident how to make it work in your favour. This part explains As some of you might remember, I did a Twitter Engagement Experiment at some time in autumn last year. Now I wanted to share my most important learnings, so you can make your Twitter presence more effective with just as little work as you want to put in. I will start with the basics and common advice you can find online in this first post and then add some more info and reflection on my personal experiment in the next one. Actually, this was all just meant to be one post but it got so crazy long that I decided to make it into a series of digestible short posts. Twitter Growth/Strategy advice for long-term improvement 14) Use the schedule feature to get out “engagement prompts” regularly. For me, this has been aread more Long-Term Twitter Strategizing: The Ninja’s “How to better promote your content on Twitter” Guide. Part 4

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Aktienkurse mit Python und LaTeX auswerten

Posted on February 14, 2021 by Uwe Ziegenhagen Feed

Hier ein einfaches Beispiel, wie man mit Python und LaTeX ein PDF mit Kursinformationen erstellen kann. Zuerst der Python-Teil, der die Apple-Kursdaten seit dem 1.1.2021 in einen Dataframe lädt und dann in eine LaTeX-Tabelle schreibt: import pandas import pandas_datareader.data as web YAHOO_TODAY="http://download.finance.yahoo.com/d/quotes.csv?s=%s&f=sd1ohgl1vl1" history = web.DataReader('AAPL', "yahoo", start="2021-1-1") history.to_latex('aapl.tex') Dann noch der LaTeX-Teil, der a) den […]

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Looking for a Maintainer

Posted on February 14, 2021 by Clemens' LaTeX Corner Feed

Over the years I created a number of LaTeX packages some of which do keep me me quite busy and have gained a solid user base. Some I wish I’d never created, but well… Other packages have their place but do actually require some serious improvement. However, I constantly fail …

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Bio Engineering, Tweet Structure or How to lure your audience: The Ninja’s “How to better promote your content on Twitter” Guide. Part 3

Posted on February 7, 2021 by LaTeX Ninja'ing and the Digital Humanities Feed

Twitter is an important professional networking platform for the Digital Humanities. But it’s not exactly self-evident how to make it work in your favour. This part explains As some of you might remember, I did a Twitter Engagement Experiment at some time in autumn last year. Now I wanted to share my most important learnings, so you can make your Twitter presence more effective with just as little work as you want to put in. I will start with the basics and common advice you can find online in this first post and then add some more info and reflection on my personal experiment in the next one. Actually, this was all just meant to be one post but it got so crazy long that I decided to make it into a series of digestible short posts. More Twitter Growth/Strategy advice 8) Set up your profile right (profile image, header image, bio text and pinned post) Set up the fourread more Bio Engineering, Tweet Structure or How to lure your audience: The Ninja’s “How to better promote your content on Twitter” Guide. Part 3

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Retweet Bots and Hashtags: The Ninja’s “How to better promote your content on Twitter” Guide. Part 2

Posted on January 31, 2021 by LaTeX Ninja'ing and the Digital Humanities Feed

Twitter is an important professional networking platform for the Digital Humanities. But it’s not exactly self-evident how to make it work in your favour. This part explains all you need to know on retweet bots and hashtags. As some of you might remember, I did a Twitter Engagement Experiment at some time in autumn last year. Now I wanted to share my most important learnings, so you can make your Twitter presence more effective with just as little work as you want to put in. I will start with the basics and common advice you can find online in this first post and then add some more info and reflection on my personal experiment in the next one. Actually, this was all just meant to be one post but it got so crazy long that I decided to make it into a series of digestible short posts. More Twitter Growth/Strategy advice 4) Use the power of (retweet) bots. During thatread more Retweet Bots and Hashtags: The Ninja’s “How to better promote your content on Twitter” Guide. Part 2

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Improve your Twitter Strategy: The Ninja’s “How to better promote your content on Twitter” Guide. Part 1

Posted on January 24, 2021 by LaTeX Ninja'ing and the Digital Humanities Feed

Twitter is an important professional networking platform for the Digital Humanities. But it’s not exactly self-evident how to make it work in your favour. As some of you might remember, I did a Twitter Engagement Experiment at some time in autumn last year. Now I wanted to share my most important learnings, so you can make your Twitter presence more effective with just as little work as you want to put in. I will start with the basics and common advice you can find online in this first post and then add some more info and reflection on my personal experiment in the next one. Actually, this was all just meant to be one post but it got so crazy long that I decided to make it into a series of digestible short posts. This first one will start with the very Twitter basics and why you might want to start your own “Twitter Engagement” experiment. Am I back toread more Improve your Twitter Strategy: The Ninja’s “How to better promote your content on Twitter” Guide. Part 1

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“Learning LaTeX – Why should you care?” Series Part 1: Common Objections against learning LaTeX

Posted on January 10, 2021 by LaTeX Ninja'ing and the Digital Humanities Feed

Since some common objections why some people think learning LaTeX is not worth it or why the oppose LaTeX generally came up again in the Twitter discussion surrounding the recent post LaTeX for Philosophers? Logic and other Shenannigans, I quickly wanted to discuss the three most common objections agains LaTeX (in my experience) and why I think they’re not necessarily valid. Let’s get straight to it! 1) The “I can’t both be a good [insert job title/area of expertise here] AND spend time learning to code” objection A common argument used against LaTeX, not only in the Humanities, is “I already need all my energy being good at my job and now you want me to learn a new technology to distract me from it?”, like expressed in the following Tweet. But it’s really an extremely common one.  The argument is interesting to me because you also had to learn how to use a computer, how to navigate the jungleread more “Learning LaTeX – Why should you care?” Series Part 1: Common Objections against learning LaTeX

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LaTeX for Philosophers? Logic and other Shenannigans

Posted on January 3, 2021 by LaTeX Ninja'ing and the Digital Humanities Feed

Today, I wanted to share LaTeX resources for philosophers with you in a short post. I was included in a Twitter discussion yesterday about whether there wasn’t a post like that and I remembered there was – because a fairly long time ago I had been planning to write a post like that myself and already had a draft lying around in the depths of my WordPress account. So this is it, a short review of resources regarding the question: Should philosophers use LaTeX and what resources are there? Personal backstory which is totally irrelevant to the actual post: Funnily enough, one of my degrees is actually a Master’s degree in Philosophy, so you could say I know the field. However, I would think of my time at the Philosophy department more like a “field trip”, so to say. (Uh-oh, today is one of those bad-pun days.) I felt like getting to know the field to broaden my horizon orread more LaTeX for Philosophers? Logic and other Shenannigans

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The question of questions: Am I ‘techie’ enough for (a) Digital Humanities (degree)?

Posted on December 27, 2020 by LaTeX Ninja'ing and the Digital Humanities Feed

For the last two years, I had the responsibility to mentor master’s degree students in the Digital Humanities or to advise those interested in a DH degree. Today I wanted to discuss the most frequently asked question and that is: “Am I ‘techie’ enough for (a) Digital Humanities (degree)?” and partly also “How much math is there in a DH degree?”. This is my Christmas present to you. I’m hoping to do something LaTeX-related again soon but LaTeX templates are currently a go-to relax thing for times when I really need relaxing. And feeling obliged to write about that takes the fun out of it for me at the moment, so sorry, yet another DH post for now. Let’s get straight to it. Part of this post consists of the text of an informational video I made in my responsibility as a mentor for the DH degree programm in Graz. You can watch the video instead, if you like. However,read more The question of questions: Am I ‘techie’ enough for (a) Digital Humanities (degree)?

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Cuti-cuti Malaysia: Customisable State-by-state Holidays Calendar for 2021

Posted on December 26, 2020 by Malaysian LaTeX User Group Feed

Another year, another Cuti-cuti Malaysia customisable calendar created with LaTeX! (Well at least this year my updates are quarterly) You can download the PDF customised for Penang here. Federal public holidays are highlighted in solid shaded pink circles, as in 12–13 February. Public holidays that are applicable for your home state (Penang in the above example) […]

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