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This page aggregates blog entries by people who are writing about TeX and related topics.

TeX Live 2021 for Debian

Posted on September 22, 2021 by There and back again Feed

The release of TeX Live 2021 is already half a year away, but due to the delay of waiting for Debian/Bullseye release, we haven’t updated TeX Live in Debian for quite some time. But...

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DANTE Herbsttagung 2021

Posted on September 10, 2021 by TeXwelt Feed

Die DANTE-Frühjahrstagung fand wegen der Corona-Kontaktbeschränkungen komplett online statt. Auch die Herbsttagung wird virtuell stattfinden, über die Plattform „Online Schule Saarland“. Das Programm, vom 17. bis 19. September 2021: Freitag, 17.9.: ab 19:30 Uhr Vorabendtreff Samstag,18.9.: ab 9 Uhr Begrüßung … Weiterlesen →

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Computers&Typesetting: Jubilee printings

Posted on September 6, 2021 by TeX Users Group Feed

Pearson has published the 35th anniversary (Jubilee) printings of the complete C&T series, including all updates from the 2021 tune-up. They are available as both hardcover and pdf, with a 40% discount for TUG members. Details on the TUG books page. Happy reading!

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DANTE Herbsttagung 2021

Posted on August 31, 2021 by TeX talk Feed

The following text is in German because it’s about the German language user group meeting…

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Talking about units

Posted on August 24, 2021 by Some TeX Developments Feed

Usually, I keep my day job (as a university lecturer in chemistry) and my LaTeX work separate. Of course, I use LaTeX at work for things like lecture handouts, but most of the time the two areas don’t directly intersect. So it was quite interesting to be talking yesterday at a chemistry conference (the ACS Fall 2021 Meeting) about siunitx. I’d been invited by Stuart Chalk to a session on units and data reuse: much more like metrology/computer science than my usual day-to-day wet chemistry! It was good to see that many of the things I do in siunitx fit into wider efforts by people who do day-to-day work on units. The idea of logical mark-up for unit input, the ability to decompose units into parts and the realities of less-than-ideal input from users were all there. Hopefully, siunitx will help with the work being done by groups such as DRUM (Digital Representation of Units of Measure) to make information more computer-readable. I’ll also be looking at QUDT for inspiration about the real technical detail of the myriad of units in real use. I also managed to get in a few comments about some LaTeX work that’s important for data ...

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LaTeX for Archaeologists: An archaeological catalogue from a spreadsheet

Posted on July 16, 2021 by LaTeX Ninja'ing and the Digital Humanities Feed

Today I wanted to share a long-promised second workflow for typesetting an archaeological catalogue in LaTeX. There is a firstread more LaTeX for Archaeologists: An archaeological catalogue from a spreadsheet

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TUG 2021 presentation proposal deadline is July 9

Posted on July 6, 2021 by TeX Users Group Feed

The deadline for presentation proposals for TUG'21 is July 9. Please send in submissions as soon as possible. The conference will be held online, August 5-8. More info: call for papers, register (no charge), conference home page.

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Looking for Arabic LaTeX engineers in Egypt

Posted on July 6, 2021 by LaTeX.org Feed

We are working with our customer to localise a maths course into Arabic. The material includes mathematical notation written in English in LaTeX and we are looking for someone who will help convert these equations into Arabic notation using LaTeX. This is a paid project.

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Navigating interdisciplinarity (as a DH scholar)

Posted on June 27, 2021 by LaTeX Ninja'ing and the Digital Humanities Feed

Today’s post is something at the interface of rant and rambling. While I love being interdisciplinary, it’s also quite the hassle at times which is why I guess most interdisciplinary scholars sometimes wished they weren’t doing interdisciplinary work. There are so many negative stereotypes, like… “You have it easier being interdisciplinary” vs it’s actually twice the work So do you really think that we have it easier? I hate how we always get this reproach that we’re taking the easy route. Can somebody please explain to me what’s “easy” about having to follow the state of the art in multiple fields at the same time? And then not even knowing where to get published because scholars from discipline A don’t understand half of your research and the same in the other direction. I tend to be somewhat “too historical” for the Digital Humanities but then waaaay to technical for the “normal Humanities”. I think being in the DH and doingread more Navigating interdisciplinarity (as a DH scholar)

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The most important book to read if you want to learn Digital Humanities, Computer Science, Maths, Programming or LaTeX

Posted on June 21, 2021 by LaTeX Ninja'ing and the Digital Humanities Feed

Today I wanted to share a tiny book review of the book I claim to be the most important book you should read if you want to learn any technical topic but are unsure if you are up for it. The book I’m talking about is not Donald Knuth (although his books are highly recommended, especially if you’re a (La)TeX nerd!). It’s not even a computer book! I’m talking about: Mindset: The New Psychology of Success by Carol Dweck (New York: Random House 2006). The fixed mindset versus the growth mindset This will be a short post because Dweck’s message is simple. There are two mindsets, the ‘fixed mindset’ and the ‘growth mindset’ and which one you have greatly impacts your success in learning and self-development. The ‘fixed mindset’ assumes your abilities and talents are fixed. Thus, you are proud of what you’re good at because you link it to your personality (“I’m a person who is good at…”). Butread more The most important book to read if you want to learn Digital Humanities, Computer Science, Maths, Programming or LaTeX

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LaTeX for thesis writing

Posted on June 13, 2021 by LaTeX Ninja'ing and the Digital Humanities Feed

Having re-read my LaTeX for PhD students post, I realized I hadn’t mentioned a lot of things I would like to impart to you. So here comes LaTeX for thesis writing – a few more arguments in favour of learning LaTeX now. The main points speaking in favour of you typesetting your thesis in LaTeX are the citation management, tables, maths and images which can be more of a hastle in MS Word. In the aforementioned blogpost, I also added that you should take into account that a thesis will yield two PDF outputs with very different requirements from the same document – another reason to use LaTeX. LaTeX for maths, images and the like (in short, everything MS Word isn’t good at) A lot of people say that the “LaTeX is great for maths” argument isn’t that strong anymore nowadays because MS Word has caught up a lot. I couldn’t tell you because I don’t usually use math inread more LaTeX for thesis writing

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StackExchange ist verkauft

Posted on June 3, 2021 by TeXwelt Feed

StackExchange, bekannt als StackOverflow, ist an Prosus verkauft worden für 1,8 Milliarden Dollar. Das beinhaltet die TeX StackExchange Q&A Seite (TeX.SE). Prosus ist ein Technology-Investor und eine Holding Company die bereits Unternehmen wie Udemy, Codecadamy und Brainly (“Your 24/7 homework … Weiterlesen →

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StackExchange has been sold

Posted on June 3, 2021 by LaTeX.net Feed

The StackExchange network by Stack Overflow Inc., has been sold to Prosus for 1.8 billion dollars. That includes the TeX Stack Exchange Q&A site aka TeX.SE. Prosus is a technology investor and holding company that already owns some learning sites such as Udemy, Codecadamy, and Brainly (“Your 24/7 homework helper”). After $153 Million funding, hiring a former investment banker to lead the company, several round of layoffs, community moderators leaving, becoming more efficient by standardizing site designs, exiting rumours, it was not surprising.

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Learning to program: Debugging – Where to start?

Posted on May 30, 2021 by LaTeX Ninja'ing and the Digital Humanities Feed

After a long hiatus, I’m back today with a post on how to develop the debugging skill. If you’re new to programming, we refer to the process of finding and solving errors in the code as “debugging”. It can be difficult to acquire this skill as a newbie when you have no idea what you should even look for. This post will help you out with a few hints. Why should I learn debugging? Most people who attend a programming class for the first time get quite the culture shock. Often, their identity had encompassed something like “good with computers”. Then they see what it’s actually like to interact with a computer as a superuser, i.e. someone who interacts with the computer not only in the way intended for users by product designers, i.e. mostly the Graphical User Interface (GUI). Often this is entirely text-based (although you can learn the first steps to programming with visual languages too, like theread more Learning to program: Debugging – Where to start?

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Citations not starting from [1]?

Posted on May 29, 2021 by Malaysian LaTeX User Group Feed

So you’re writing your thesis, and you’ve made very sure to use \bibliographystyle{IEEEtran}, or another style that numbers your citations sequentially throughout your thesis. Of course you would then expect that the first citation in your first chapter is [1], right? Right? So why does it not start from [1] in your own thesis; the […]

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