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This page aggregates blog entries by people who are writing about TeX and related topics.

November News Update

Posted on November 14, 2019 by Overleaf Feed

As we edge closer to the end of the year, we are starting to wrap up 2019 projects and look ahead to what 2020 will bring. But before that, we’d love to fill you in on some exciting recent developments.

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New Feature: Transfer Project Ownership on Overleaf

Posted on November 12, 2019 by Overleaf Feed

We’re delighted to present a new feature on Overleaf that enables project owners to transfer the ownership of projects to a collaborator. So if you have to take a step back from a particular project, for whatever reason—perhaps you started a project but are no longer involved, or you’re heading out on holiday and would like a collaborator to manage it whilst you’re away—you can now do so in a few simple clicks.

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TUGboat 40:3 published

Posted on November 10, 2019 by TeX Users Group Feed

TUGboat volume 40, number 3, a regular issue, has been mailed to TUG members. It is also available online and from the TUG store. In addition, prior TUGboat issue 40:2, the TUG 2019 (Palo Alto) proceedings, is now publicly available. Please consider joining or renewing your TUG membership if you haven't already, and thanks.

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siunitx v3 alpha 2

Posted on November 2, 2019 by Some TeX Developments Feed

I’ve been talking about a new version of siunitx for a number of years now, and progress has been slower than I’d hoped. After something of a hiatus (I released the first alpha last year), I’ve been back looking at the code again and expanding the range of tests to try to pick up more of the hidden bugs. I’m hoping now to have a reasonably regular alpha series as I build toward a first feature-complete beta, probably by the Spring. Taking advantage of the possibilities offered by GitHub and Travis-CI, I’ve decided to place the zip files there rather than upload them here to my blog. (To be fair, the blog itself is currently hosted by GitHub too!) The work on version 3 is taking place throughout the codebase, but the differences between the first and second alpha versions are focussed in two areas Testing the backward-compatibility options Beginning to implement quantities There are still a lot of features to add, but for me the code works as a user. Of course, I don’t use most of the features! One thing that’s definitely not done is full compatibility with version 2 font features. At the moment, I feel I’ll ...

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TeX Live/Debian updates 20191030

Posted on October 31, 2019 by There and back again Feed

Another month, another update of TeX Live in Debian with the usual long list of updated and new packages. The reappearance of turtle graphics via PStricks packages pst-turtle made me laugh. I used turtle...

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Notice of 2019 Annual General Meeting

Posted on October 25, 2019 by UK-TUG Feed

The 2019 UK-TUG Annual General Meeting (AGM) will be held on Saturday 16th November at 14:00. The meeting will take place in the Fletcher Room, Trinity College, Oxford, OX1 3BH. We hope that as members as possible will be able to attend the AGM. Notice is hereby given for the following. 1. Election of Chair There were no nominations in 2018 for the position of Chair, which is therefore vacant. Anyone…

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Overleaf Server Pro v2 is Now Available!

Posted on October 24, 2019 by Overleaf Feed

At Overleaf we’re always looking at ways to continually improve our product. Since we joined forces with ShareLaTeX in mid-2017, we’ve worked hard to bring the best elements of Overleaf and ShareLaTeX together. With the new combined platform successfully launched and new features being frequently added, we’ve now brought a number of those upgrades to our on-premise solutions - Overleaf Community Edition and Overleaf Server Pro!

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Overleaf at CERN: Supporting Thousands of Research Collaborations

Posted on October 22, 2019 by Overleaf Feed

In 2016, CERN was looking to adopt a single, collaborative authoring tool to provide to their researchers. They conducted a year-long trial of three platforms, with Overleaf (https://www.overleaf.com) emerging as the best fit.

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New Overleaf PayPal gateway: what you need to know

Posted on October 21, 2019 by Overleaf Feed

As we continue to work on making our systems more efficient, we have recently updated our PayPal payment gateway. This change may affect some customers who previously paid their subscription via PayPal as they may receive a ‘payment declined’ notification. Here's what you need to know.

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Pleasures of Tibetan input and typesetting with TeX

Posted on October 21, 2019 by There and back again Feed

Many years ago I decided to learn Tibetan (and the necessary Sanskrit), and enrolled in the university studies of Tibetology in Vienna. Since then I have mostly forgotten Tibetan due to absolute absence of...

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October News Update

Posted on October 17, 2019 by Overleaf Feed

September is always a busy month for us here at Overleaf, as for a lot of our users it marks the start of the new academic year, bringing with it a mixture of new and returning students, along with the researchers and teachers preparing for their new classes. So welcome back if you’ve just been on a summer break! Since the launch of Overleaf v2, we’ve continued to work hard behind the scenes to make many updates and improvements to the platform (including the newly released TeXLive 2018 image), and we appreciate everyone that’s written in to report bugs or with feature suggestions; you all help us make Overleaf better for everyone.

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Update collaborator permissions more easily on Overleaf

Posted on October 15, 2019 by Overleaf Feed

Today we released a small but hopefully very useful update to the Share modal in the Overleaf editor: project owners can now change their existing collaborators' permissions without having to remove and re-invite them!

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TUGboat 40:2 published

Posted on October 14, 2019 by TeX Users Group Feed

TUGboat volume 40, number 2, the TUG 2019 (Palo Alto) proceedings, has been mailed to TUG members. It is also available online and from the TUG store. In addition, prior TUGboat issue 40:1 is now publicly available. Please consider joining or renewing your TUG membership if you haven't already, and thanks.

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Zwei Aufgabenblätter auf einer Seite mit LaTeX

Posted on October 13, 2019 by Uwe Ziegenhagen Feed

Für meine Studierenden erstelle ich diverse Übungsblätter, damit das Thema „Python“ etwas anschaulicher wird. Dazu nutze ich ein angepasstes LaTeX-Template, mit dem ich die Seite dupliziere und in verkleinerter Form auf das DIN A4-Blatt bringe. %!TEX TS-program = Arara % arara: pdflatex: {shell: yes} % arara: pdflatex: {shell: yes} % arara: clean: { extensions: [ […]

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Benannte Referenzen in LaTeX

Posted on October 12, 2019 by Uwe Ziegenhagen Feed

Neben \ref{} und \pageref{} gibt es mit \nameref noch einen weiteren Befehl zur Referenzierung von Labels. \nameref{} gibt dabei den Titel des referenzierten Abschnitts aus. Daraus kann man dann auch einen \niceref{} Befehl bauen, der sowohl den Titel als auch die Seitenzahl in Klammern referenziert. \documentclass[12pt,ngerman]{scrartcl} \usepackage{babel} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{csquotes} \usepackage{hyperref} \usepackage{fdsymbol} \newcommand{\niceref}[1]{\enquote{\nameref{sec:abschnitt}} (\(\triangleright\)~\pageref{sec:abschnitt})} \begin{document} Siehe […]

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